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  • M. E. Rosson

Your Journey to Bethlehem

Journey to Bethlehem part one

Text: Matthew 2:1-2

Matthew 2

King James Version

2 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

2 Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.

Let us Pray

Most people have a time in their life when they seek a higher power, a teacher, a Mentor, God because they feel an emptiness inside. They ask, is this all, why am I here? The Late Billy Graham used to say that all men and women have a God sized Vacuum inside that they try to fill with anything they can find, drugs, alcohol, religion, friends, and yet only God can fill that empty spot inside. This Morning we are going to speak of Wise men, who were searching for a god to worship, as we look at Part one of Journey to Bethlehem!

1. So lets look at our Text again:


2 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

2 Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.

So who were these so-called Wise men?

This is what the Encyclopedia Britannica says:

Magi, singular Magus, also called Wise Men, in Christian tradition, the noble pilgrims “from the East” who followed a miraculous guiding star to Bethlehem, where they paid homage to the infant Jesus as king of the Jews (Matthew 2:1–12). Christian theological tradition has always stressed that Gentiles as well as Jews came to worship Jesus—an event celebrated in the Eastern church at Christmas and in the West at Epiphany (January 6). Eastern tradition sets the number of Magi at 12, but Western tradition sets their number at three, probably based on the three gifts of “gold, frankincense, and myrrh” (Matthew 2:11) presented to the infant.

Now some call them Kings as early as the 3rd Century, probably because of the prophecy in Psalm 72:11:

May all kings fall down before him

In about the 8th century the names of three Magi—Bithisarea, Melichior, and Gathaspa—appear in a chronicle known as the Excerpta latina barbari. They have become known most commonly as Balthasar, Melchior, and Gaspar (or Casper). According to Western church tradition, Balthasar is often represented as a king of Ethiopia, Melchior as a king of Persia, and Gaspar as a king of India.

So why would these Kings, from Ethiopia, Persia, modern-day Iran and India join together in a quest that would take them two years to find, because they believed that Stars foretold the future. They saw a Star in the East where they were from, and they believed this Star would only appear to announce a King.

NOTE: Isn’t it funny how God can use nonsensical beliefs to draw people to Him, so that they can become true believers!

So what does history tell us about the Star of Bethlehem? Wouldn't you like to hear more of Part 1? Come this Sunday, if you are worried about social Distancing, we have the Radio on 87.9 in the parking lot and you can sit unbothered in the fellowship hall and hear the radio there. We want you to be safe, but also to get fed from God's Word and draw strength from the fellowship of other believers! As we begin this Month of the Celebration of Jesus' Birth, we will stay after Church and Green up the Building along with our very special Lottie Moon Missions Tree. Our Goal for Lottie Moon is $1000 this year and it is my hope that we far exceed that goal! It is my Joy to be your Pastor,

M. E. Rosson



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